Dates: November 4th - November 7th
Friday 7 to 11 /// Reception 11.4.2016

"MUD" is a multimedia project focused on the tremendous sociological and environmental repercussions of an iron ore mine which burst in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The goal is to raise awareness of this tragedy on its one year anniversary in order to ensure that it is never forgotten.Through photos, videos and interviews the project unearths the extensive human rights violations caused by the gross negligence of the mining company, Samarco, and raises awareness of the continuous environmental repercussions for the river, the Rio Doce. On November 5th 2015, a colossal mudslide caused by the collapse of Samarco’s “Fundão Dam” tore through the towns of Bento Rodrigues and Paracatu de Baixo without any warning, killing 19 people and displacing thousands. Our team visited these mud-torn towns and filmed what remained once the ruins had been excavated. The photos expose the eerie remnants of the residents’ past lives and the destruction that the dam’s contents had left behind, 5 months after the occurrence of the most significant environmental disasters of our time. "MUD" hopes to unsettle viewers with the captured images so that they can be visually transported to a reality of homes, of business and history buried under the negligence of the mining industry. By bringing to light the ruins of small towns and river communities lost under mining residues, we aim for viewers to feel the pain and suffering of the victims through the reality of landscapes torn by mining residues.Furthermore, the iron-mining waste continued to travel 300 miles down the Rio Doce, eventually reaching the Atlantic Ocean in Espirito Santo. We conducted interviews with residents and fishermen who had spent their entire lives in communion with the Rio Doce and who now referred to it as being “dead”. We understood that it was our purpose as filmmakers to tell the story of this river and its people. The biodiversity of the river was destroyed with currents of poisonous mining wastes occupying what was once the major clean water source for the region. Today, the Rio Doce is poisonous to even enter. We focused on how this catastrophe has robbed the way of life from numerous river dwelling communities that are dependent on fishing, tourism and marine conservation, forcing them into a continual struggle with no end in sight. Our goal is to give the victims the attention and opportunities they deserve to move forward and start over again.

Con Artist Collective & Gallery
119 Ludlow St. New York, New York 10002
Open Monday through Saturday 11am to 7pm